Straying from Nature: In the Eighth Prasad, Planetmates Tell How Economic Pressures Won Out Over Happiness for Early Humans (updated)

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“Stay-at-Home” Moms Were Under Pressure Even Hundreds of Thousands of Years Ago! For Early Humans, Prosperity and Survival Advantages Won Out Over Healthy, Happy Newborns

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The Great Reveal from the Planetmates. The Eighth Prasad: Straying from Nature – Prosperity Won Out Over Happiness for Early Humans

Planetmates Release The Eighth Prasad

So giving birth prematurely and bipedalism had survival advantages….

Survival won out over healthy, happy newborns and relatively pain-free births.

Leopard was First Consciousness at The Eighth Prasad.

"It is at the point when narrow pelvises, nine-month gestations, birth pain and trauma for mothers and newborns, and dependency on caregivers for survival for the first few years of life became the norm that you began to be separate from all other Earth Citizens and began the process of becoming human."

The Eighth Prasad – Straying from Nature

All these factors acted on each other for millions of years: Wide-pelvis mothers giving birth to healthy, twenty-month gestated newborns vied against the economic pressures for females to give birth earlier and become more productive as a forager sooner as well as to be bipedal and be able to carry more with the hands and to move, even run, more quickly while holding your young, who born prematurely could no longer hang on to mother and even later when able to grasp found little hair to cling to, though the mother’s hair was helpful when in the water with her.

So giving birth prematurely and bipedalism had survival advantages. More and more, over a long, long period of time, the survival advantages won out over healthy, happy newborns and relatively easy, painless births with long gestations and fetuses nurtured near perfectly in the womb by a divinely designed biological process.

It is at the point when narrow pelvises, nine-month gestations, birth pain and trauma for mothers and newborns, and dependency on caregivers for survival for the first few years of life became the norm that you began to be separate from all other Earth Citizens and began the process of becoming human. But this early humanoid type was still a far cry from what all Earth beings – humans and nonhumans – think of as human today.

Video Commentary by SillyMickel Adzema

What follows is a video of a reading of The Eighth Prasad, with commentary, elaboration, and context, by SillyMickel Adzema.

“The Eighth Prasad” From The Great Reveal by The Planetmates – the audiocast

The link above takes you to the audio-only version of my commentary on The Seventh Prasad, exactly as is in the video. Click on the link to go the the audio site, or you can listen to it here using the audio player below.

http://ecdn0.hark.com/swfs/player_fb.swf?pid=wkrvwhfyzf
Image of The 8th Prasad. “The Great Reveal” By The Planetmates

Paraphrase/Elaboration of “The Eighth Prasad” — by SillyMickel Adzema

It took millions of years for all these factors to play out. They vied with each other and your proto-human bodies changed in ways that tended in one direction and then another, sometimes back and forth, in accordance with changes in your environs and through the processes of natural selection which would have the most adaptable of those body changes increasing, in relation to the changing environment; and the least adaptable body changes decreasing out of the fact that those who had them would be less likely to have children, so there would be less offspring containing those body changes.

The factors of a wide pelvis, where gestations would be longer and where births would be less painful, vied against the needs for females to spend less time in pregnancy in order to better fend for themselves in survival, especially in being more successful at foraging, where gestations would be shorter and births would be more painful.

The factors of a wide pelvis and easier birth vied against the advantages of a narrower pelvis and the increased facility that came with that for bipedal locomotion and the new advantage of having the upper limbs available to perform additional functions of carrying and object manipulation.

The factors of a wide pelvis and a healthier, happier baby vied against those forces involving increased ability of the mother to forage, better locomotion for the mother, and the survival advantages that came with increasing use of the upper limbs as hands.

The body changes that were occurring in accordance with these factors, other than the size and shape of the pelvic bones, included increasing brain size to deal with psychological pain of birth and post-natal deprivation, and an increase in the amount of time outside the womb during which that brain size could happen. This last put pressures on the external nurturing environment to find a way to deal with it, that is to say, the mother and the social group had to go through changes. We will discuss the changes needed in the social structure later — for example, the need for additional attentiveness to the needs of the infant and mother both during gestation but also for years afterward that would be aided by supportive others in the social environment, whether that was the father being more involved in caring for the mother or the social environment being more conducive to the development of families and supportive of those giving birth and doing child caring. For now, though, we will describe the physical changes in the mother that were brought about by these pressures.

As mentioned, the mother, with increasing bipedalism, would have new facility in the use of the upper limbs and hands. These were advantages in survival, for they aided in foraging, especially in a water environment where food items needed to be reached for and grabbed — these food items would be underwater most of the time — and not just grabbed and manipulated with the mouth and paws in the open air, as most mammals do. Certainly your nearest relatives have use of the hands, for those hands would be especially helpful in a tree-dwelling species where tree limbs could more easily be grasped with them.

But the use of the hands and the uprightness of the body which freed the upper limbs, would have even more advantage in a water environment and thus would stimulate their increasing development. Hands that were more dexterous and more sensitive could more easily feel under water that could not be seen through to better identify, dislodge and or capture, and thus acquire the food being gathered there. Certainly, there is less need for the sense of smell in a water environment and so that ability diminished in you. But there would be an increase in the need for the hands to be better able to feel, find, and manipulate food. So your forebears became less able to smell in general and that would apply to less ability to identify food sources but they became instead more sensitive in sensing the environment with the hands and more able in their use with increasing dexterity and the development and refinement of the fingers.

But there was an additional advantage that corresponded nicely with the pressure to have births earlier and the fact that the infant would be more helpless after birth and more dependent after birth for a longer time while the brain increased in size and was developing. These, as mentioned, would create a need for the mother and/or caregivers to be more attentive to the needs of a very needy infant; they would also need to become better at nurturing; and they would need to do it for a much longer time. One of the obvious things was that the baby, having even less ability for independent movement than other planetmates, would need to be carried and moved. The increasing freeing up of the hands with bipedalism and the increasing dexterity of those hands both facilitated that ability to carry and move the infant.

Another part of this was that in a water environment, hair and fur were not as advantageous as the nakedness that you began to have, which all aquatic mammals have in order to facilitate their movement in the water. Your nearest planetmate relatives have young who, being more developed after birth, are able to cling to the fur of their mother while the mother is foraging or attending to other matters. What would happen with the mother losing its fur and the baby less able to hang on anyway? Well, the answer is that the mother would have to hold the child. No other planetmate has to spend so much time holding its offspring as do humans. So, the mother would be aided in doing that with increasing ability to use the upper limbs, thus pushing for more bipedalism, and with increasing dexterity in the hands: The baby having less ability to hold on, the mother would have to make up for that with its ability to grab, contain, and manipulate the newborn.

Additionally, the baby being dependent longer, needing to be nurtured and fed and unable to do that well, and needing to be held for the infant cannot hold onto fur, the mother would be able to do that better by holding the baby in front of her. The baby would need to nurse and the mothers with larger breasts would be better able to accommodate that — larger breasts would be closer to an infant’s mouth with the infant in arms and the infant would not need to be lifted up to feed. So your kind began having larger breasts than any other planetmate.

Another body change that corresponded to all this is that while you were losing hair in an aquatic environment to better adapt to that, still there was a survival advantage to having hair on the head while in the water. At a certain age, babies would be better able to hold on, and when they would be taken to forage with the mother in the water, there would be an advantage to mothers with longer hair on the head for the baby to grab onto to stay in contact with the mother and to not be separated, which could be fatal. The head, after all, would be the only part of the body that would need to be out of the water while foraging.

There were other survival advantages — that came with the other factors of loss of fur, greater dependence of babies, and so on — to bipedalism, having better facility in the upper arms, and having better dexterity in the hands that had to do with the mother being able to move and run more quickly, when needed, while holding and carrying the infant. All those changes in the body would make those who had them more likely to survive in general, but especially, in an environment that would have predators, would increase the likelihood of those having those changes to have both the mother and the child of that mother to survive. So those body changes would increase among proto-humans.

But, as mentioned, all these changes had the cost of increasing birth pain; prematurity of infants, with the consequence that your kind would be deprived, compared to us, of the near perfect gestation, and guidance, by Nature for about half of your brain’s development; and increasing non-ideal of the satisfaction of biological needs after birth. Put simply, your young would suffer more. Your advantages to survival after birth would be bought at the cost of having happy, healthy newborns and painless births.

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And since that suffering would be overwhelming for a neonate and infant, both at birth and for the period after, it would be repressed, and its existence as an unconscious component for the rest of your lives would mean, not only that your babies would be unhappier, but you would be unhappier throughout your lives. Hence, we would see you not just as naked ape but as suffering ape. For you would stand out against all planetmates as being the ones with the most misery and the least ability to participate in the enjoyment of life.

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Your survival, therefore, was bought at the cost of both increased pain for your newborns and babies as well as increased unhappiness for adults.

So, these are the ways you became separate from all other planetmates and how and why they happened. They define you as human. They happened over the course of millions of years, so your earliest ancestors were a far cry, quite distant in all ways from the way you are today … indeed they were just like the other planetmates and Earth Citizens you see around you today. But, these changes occurring over vast expanses of time, you did become gradually separate from Nature and all of its ways.

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It is at the point when all these factors had reached the point of development roughly like what they are for you today, that we can say you were human. Being human occurred for the ape that once was you when you had nine-month gestations; had narrow pelvises and facile bipedalism and use of hands and arms; had an unusual and overwhelming amount of pain at birth for the child, but also for the mother; had large brains full of ways to keep the vestiges of your painful beginnings at bay throughout life to survive, regardless of the convoluted and bizarre thoughts and misinterpretations of Reality that would come out of that excessive ideation; and had an exceptionally long time of helplessness after birth — the first few years of life — requiring an extraordinary amount of care from caregivers and investment of time in this task. It is when these became the norm for you that you could be considered human.

And these things would be the foundation upon which all your other changes would be built. They are the basis upon which all your other “accomplishments” in becoming human could happen. But to us, they are the branching off from the tree of Nature upon which all the other abnormalities that you developed in alienation from Nature could grow … and would be needed.

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Continue with The Great Reveal from the Planetmates, The Ninth Prasad: Eden and the Fall … Harmony with Nature, Early Humans, Foragers

Return to The Great Reveal from the Planetmates, The Seventh Prasad: Becoming Human, Bipedalism Caused Birth Pain

To Read the Entire Book … on-line, free at this time … Go to The Great Reveal from The Planetmates

To purchase any of Michael Adzema’s books, available in print and e-book formats, go to Michael Adzema’s books at Amazon.

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About sillymickel

Activist, psychotherapist, pre- and perinatal psychologist, author, and environmentalist. I seek to inspire others to our deeper, more natural consciousness, to a primal, more delightful spirituality, and to taking up the cause of saving life on this planet, as motivated by love.

Posted on December 11, 2013, in Anthropology, audio, authenticity, being yourself, Birth, Child Abuse, Consciousness, Environmentalism, Evolution, individualism, life, Metaphysics, Mystical, nonconform, Philosophy, Primal Spirit, Primal Spirituality, Psychology, Spirituality, uniqueness, video and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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